At this family "do", my Uncle Daryle tells my father the secrets to mixing a Peach Keen ****ed Up Monkey martini. The next thing I know he is on all fours rummaging through the cupboards to find the perfect ingredients for this creation that we must have.
At this family “do”, my Uncle Daryle tells my father the secrets to mixing a Peachy Keen ****ed Up Monkey martini. The next thing I know he is on all fours rummaging through the cupboards to find the perfect ingredients for this creation that we must have.

So it’s been nearly a month since I’ve been back in the Queen City and blogging has been difficult. Several times I’ve started to write, but ended up deleting the entry. Somehow nothing seems worthy of writing about. It’s weird because there have been plenty of humourous everyday occurrences. My mind is still constantly running a commentary and summer in downtown Regina is prime people watching (there are some interesting characters out there). However, I can’t seem to find the right words to describe it all.

I’m experiencing a strange mix of feelings. One moment I’m loving the fact that I can do the dishes with just a touch of a button and the next I’m cursing the labyrinth that is the Walmart parking lot. Probably the thing that has hit me the hardest is the lack of spontaneity in our culture. In the temporary life that we were living in Sri Lanka nothing felt as serious or long lasting.

Having arrived back in Canada, we are expected to make plans and think of the future- boring. Life seems to be measured by what you are going to do and what you are going to buy. Nothing at all was measured in Sri Lanka. Not a single household would even own measuring cups for cooking. When I first arrived and asked Aunty Nagani, “How do you know how much spice to put in?” She replied, “It just feels right. You follow your gut.”

Now that sounds like some good advice. Only half the time I don’t know what my gut is telling me because my mind is racing.

Tonight as Shaun and I sit shivering on our balcony and listening to sounds of the Exhibition (Regina’s Fair), we’ve compiled some random wisdom for people returning to Canada after a stint overseas.

  • Track down your nearest specialty grocery store. Tony’s India Food Centre, “Where the spice is right” has been a godsend.
  • Prepare standard answers to stupid questions. The best way to deal with this is to make your answer sound like an ancient Chinese proverb. For example, when someone asks how your trip was reply with, “A trip is always good, but a journey; that is a test.”
  • Don’t fist bump every immigrant you pass on the street. You might feel like you are one of them, but you will freak them out.
  • Realize that no matter what you say, you will offend someone. We can’t keep this politically correct language straight. Referring to people as Indian can get very confusing in our province, and saying East Indian just seems weird now.
  • Connect with others who have traveled. As long as he or she is not a one uper,  you will have a brilliant conversation with travel stories including agreeing that monkeys can never be trusted.
  • Invite people over for (insert country name) food. People love food, and ethnic food makes them feel open minded.
  • Make sure you are getting plenty of rest and exercise and don’t feel guilty if some days you just need to lie in bed and shut out the world for a bit. It’s normal.

That’s all for now. We are off to LA in the morning to visit good friends and hopefully collect some more blog worthy material.

Trina

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